Volume 5, Issue 1
January, 2007
Policy
Process
Process
Process

Process
Map of The Month
P A R A L L A X
___________

an apparent change in the direction of an object caused by a change in observational positioning that creates a new line of sight.
From the Greek: to change
Para: to see.
Tagnreaderville *
By Laura Faught
A delightful story about how the use of RFID technology and supporting business processes can ultimately transform the way we live, work, and play. Follow Suzy Shopper and Peter Procurer as they and their children move about on one particular weekend.
Read the Article


Retail Style Trends for 2007 *
By Ann Grackin
Did you ever notice that the product names imply that they are here for me? I know these products of the not too distant future (like now) are good economic buys for retailers. It has to work for them. It has to enhance productivity, efficiency, reduce shrink, increase sales, and improve throughput in some measurable way...
But they also must solve the customer's problem, too, or they will never get to add those benefits.
Read the Article


Complimentary articles marked with an asterisk *


Dear Colleagues,

Many innovations and ideas don’t really make it to prime time until many of the originally visionaries have retired.  And sometimes the ideas are a new twist on an old theme—like On Demand. Many of these started as exchanges during the e days and evolved to fully robust applications, way beyond just identifying buyers and sellers.

Quite a few of these ideas just reach that tipping point, such as outsourcing. I guess those of us who lived thru the bloody 90s of downsizing could see the deforestation of the manufacturing sector. We asked you all to take the survey on what was important this year. Managing across the global linkages— Resilient Supply Chains—was the highest rated issue.  And your concerns are still, rightly, about the impact of this on US jobs. 

I thought it would be interesting, as well, to look backward and forward to how we started each year and what we predicted in the components to address would be:

  • 2003:
    • Planning vs. execution blur in Supply Chain systems. No longer categorizing solutions this way, but time-phasing solutions from strategic to Real time.
    • Business events powered by network based real time architectures
    •  RFID’s grand entrance
    • Federated business models and outsourcing: how to live with it, how to make it work.
  • 2004
    • On Demand Now
    • RFID goes main stream, this is beyond the Military and Maritime worlds into many other applications
    • Impacts of Global Trade
  • 2005
    • 3D Views of Technology. Here we talked a lot about the Delivery Architecture. Federation and Virtual business need an inter- enterprise web services approach for sharing workflows, data, and processes.
    • Supply Chain basics, plus the role of the Supply Chain Orchestrate!
  • 2006
    • 4th Dimension Technologies. Technology is taking over with the Nano level of all things: from RFID to sensors to Biometrics; from medication breakthroughs to business.
    • Mobility platforms rule
    • Data Management. How are we going to grapple with all this?

Interestingly, one of the highest rated challenges stated was the issue of Data Management. We think that RFID, without a process to manage it, will exacerbate one of the very problems people hope it will solve—data quality. And then there's the ongoing issue of what to do with that data?

And what is for 2007? A year to Make it Happen. And a year to create a vision. Read Laura Faught's article on Tagnreaderville for a vision of the future. And read Bill McBeath's article on what 2007 will be about, technology wise. 

Other questions persist. Will RFID adoption go main stream? I think there are many ideas that will stick. But questions persist, from Inhibitors to adoption, and plain, simple questions on what is that and why do I need it? Creating a roadmap that works for you needs to be thought through. I guess that is what Q1s are all about.

For you impatient people, I leave you with the words of Sir Donald Ross:

"The world requires at least ten years to understand a new idea, however simple or important it may be.”



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