I really liked reading Hollender's thoughts on business process and ethics.
He obviously knows the story behind the issues that consumers hear very
little about. It is interesting to think of all the businesses that have gone under because of market pricing that consumers to not know about. We just see a price for the end product in a cup. My question is, absolute capitalism or social capitalism, where does the US fit in, and where do other countries fit in? In other words, how capitalistic is every society? Perhaps the more capitalistic, we see less economic advantages for smaller players. I know in Japan they have small household stores with less inventory, high prices, but they will never go out of business because of relationships (social values).

In the US, convenience/household stores are lucky to last 3 months. Our values are so different. I like how Hollender made me think about the issues. I guess I really have sympathy for our farmers....

Take care, Matt McDevitt


Bill,

Recently I read your article "SmallSmartFast Organizations".

I enjoyed very much to read:
" As a former software engineer, I noticed that a small team of 3-4
engineers was sometimes more productive (produced more working,
quality code that met the end customers? needs) than a large team of
30-40."

Finally, a human-being voice was heard among a choir of the "white
noise" usually related to this topic. And this voice said: "The king
is naked!".

Your explanations where really simple and clear and at the same time -
without insulting the intelligence of the audience.

Thank you!
Dmeetry,


Your article on software firms makes me keep trying to guess which firms you are referring to. Problem is, there are so many of us who made these mistakes. I did find it a little harder to follow your logic on this second article. Your first, one on why software firms don’t grow, had a great format and we have discussed this inside our firm. Looking forward to more of these ideas, ChainLink. Keep up the good work!

Name withheld, President SCM software firm


 

 

 

©2004 ChainLink Research, Inc.